1
2
3signs, and proved after death by the post-mortem appearances. (2.)
4
5
6of the left ventricle. The mitral valve is situated towards the upper
7
8times produces a wine with a considerably greater amount of alcohol
9
10in part replaced by some adventitious product. Towards the base,
11
12
13thick with a deficient sediment, not settling favorably, but casting down a crude but
14stroke, severe falls, and blows on the back of the head or spine ; and
15to the nerves of the head and trunk ; while they also conduct, in an
16was reduced to 10 st. in 3 months ; 20 out of 28 observed, were between
17
18lan, op. cit., p. 334). [See Sclerosis of the Lung by Editor.]
19would seem to be the bringing on of arterial-spasm, and the conse-
20lating pulse of typhus. In the one disease the contractile force is
21air, which renders it not less imperative that we should, if possible,
22
23subsequent ones happen from any urethral discharge, or irritation. In a
24ometer are felt only as one, no matter how great the space between them,
25
26
27
28with the spirometer. He has especially examined how far a ca-
29
30
31Frequency of the Pulse indicated by the Sphygmograph,
32
33
34coholis, f^xiv. In chronic cases, half a grain of corrosive sublimate may
35
36contiguous to each other, become diseased, and new materials of a
37
38
39Cardinal, a celebrated Irydrocephalic man about London, long in
40
41children in whom the disease has been observed early and carefully
42the nutrition of the patient, according to rules already laid down.]